OVERVIEW

American Dairy Queen, the domestic franchising arm of International Dairy Queen, is a leading franchisor of fast food restaurants, with more than 6,000 Dairy Queen outlets scattered across the United States. DQ’s menu includes standard fare like burgers, hot dogs, chicken sandwiches and salads, in addition to specialty frozen desserts such as DQ-branded cakes, pies, sundaes and Blizzard treats. DQ and its parent company are owned by Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway.

GIVING

DQ’s corporate giving program provides a mix of cash and product support to children and families in need in the communities across the country served by its restaurants. Specific focus areas include:

  • Creating opportunities for special needs children that may not otherwise exist.
  • Promoting safe, healthy, nurturing environments where children can belong.
  • Offering educational, recreational and mentoring opportunities.
  • Supporting residents of low-income communities/meeting basic needs.

DQ’s most significant charitable partnership is with Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, which the company has sponsored since 1984. During the past 30 years, DQ operators throughout the United States and Canada have raised more than $100 million for CMN Hospitals. Its efforts range from asking DQ customers to “round up” their purchase totals to selling paper Miracle Balloons and holding special events like Miracle Treat Day to raise funds and awareness for CMN Hospitals.

The company also offers in-kind donations of DQ product (primarily Dilly Bars) to Minnesota-based nonprofit organizations that help kids and families who need it most in the Twin Cities. These donations can be used as treats to be given out at nonprofit program events, or can come in the form of DQ Dilly Bars for a Year Certificates that can be auctioned off to raise money for charity.

In addition to its corporate initiatives, many individual Dairy Queen restaurant operators provide cash and/or product donations to groups in their local communities. Typically, these initiatives feature free or discounted food products, and are focused on K–12 public school students. Some examples include:

  • Dairy Queen restaurant tours. Many Dairy Queen operators offer tours of their restaurant to kids in grades 1–4. Students who visit learn how the facility operates and the importance of cleanliness and hard work. At the end of the tour, students learn how to make their own DQ ice cream cone, and then enjoy eating it.
  • Student discounts. Recognizing that high school and college students are typically low on cash, Dairy Queen operators often provide discount cards or create affordable Student Meal Deals.
  • Product donations. Many Dairy Queen operators provide frozen cakes or other products for school activities, such as a class project, high school prom or graduation party.

Visit the company’s website for more information.